Tagged: Magic Johnson

OKC Adds Melo, NBA Arms Race Escalates

The 2017 NBA offseason is the gift that keeps on giving. The Indiana Pacers trading Paul George to the Oklahoma City Thunder was not enough. The Los Angeles Clippers trading Chris Paul to the Houston Rockets was not enough. The Chicago Bulls trading Jimmy Butler to the Minnesota Timberwolves was not enough. Gordon Hayward signing with the Boston Celtics was not enough. The Cleveland Cavaliers trading Kyrie Irving to the Celtics for Isaiah Thomas was not enough.

The Los Angeles Lakers getting fined for tampering because Magic Johnson talked about Paul George on a talk show was not enough. Kevin Durant using a fake Twitter account to trash Russell Westbrook and Billy Donovan was not enough. Even this morning, the President of the United States uninviting Steph Curry to the White House when Curry said he did not want to attend, followed by LeBron James calling the POTUS a bum on Twitter (and in turn, causing “u bum” to trend) was not enough.

Adrian Wojnarowski of ESPN (which is still weird to say after all his years at Yahoo Sports) reported last night that New York Knicks forward Carmelo Anthony had added Cleveland and Oklahoma City to the list of teams he wished to be traded, and this afternoon, Woj reported that the Knicks had traded Melo to the Thunder for Enes Kanter, Doug McDermott, and a 2018 2nd round draft pick. A summer after losing Kevin Durant to free agency, they have a big three of Westbrook, George, and Anthony, and that is going to be very, very interesting.

Credit must be given to OKC GM Sam Presti, who has made his share of mistakes (most notably trading James Harden when he did, for what he got), and the loss of Durant was something that could have sunk the franchise into a decade of futility, but he acted instead of letting it happen and letting Westbrook leave. There is very little chance of George staying long-term, but the newly created trifecta could be enough to win now if things break the right way. These trades are bold moves for a small market franchise that has no chance of getting players of that caliber as free agents. 

I don’t know if this is going to work. I thought the Timberwolves would be a playoff team last year, and I thought the Brooklyn Nets would contend when they traded for Paul Pierce and Kevin Garnett, and Jason Kidd had never coached and NBA game before that season. What I do know is Westbrook and George got their teams to the playoffs last year as lone superstars, and that Melo best thrives when he does not have to be the #1 guy, like in the Olympics. With Russ and George already there, OKC is a better than average opportunity for the 33 year old Melo to become Olympic Melo once again. Does that put them ahead of the Spurs? Probably. The Rockets? Maybe. The defending champion Golden State Warriors? Probably not, but I would like to see them try.

I have been critical of Carmelo Anthony in the past, as many NBA fans have been over the years. I have never been a huge fan of his game, but the more I think about it, the issue I mostly had was the way teams play when Melo is their #1 option. He was The Guy in Denver, and again in New York (Linsanity notwithstanding), but for all the criticism of his selfish play, that criticism could not fairly extend beyond the basketball court. Melo is charitable, and one of the more socially aware NBA players in this new age of athlete activism. Just yesterday, he set up a donation page on The Players’ Tribune for hurricane relief for Puerto Rico. He may not have been the guy you want to build a championship team around like LeBron or Dwyane Wade were, but in a world with a lot of legitimately evil people catching breaks and moving up, Carmelo Anthony being in a better basketball situation than the comically dysfunctional Knicks is hardly the worst thing that can happen.

Last season, one of the biggest criticisms of the NBA was the inevitability of outcome. From the beginning of July, everyone knew the Warriors would meet the Cavaliers in the Finals for the third straight year. This year, the Warriors are not going anywhere, and the Cavs will be good so long as they have LeBron, but teams around them–the Thunder, the Rockets, and the Celtics, all got more interesting. Will interesting be good enough? We will find out soon enough.

Advertisements

Meet the New Boss

I’ve written before about franchise players who will never be eclipsed, primarily in the context of Boston’s teams. Because of Bill Russell, Larry Bird could never be better than the second best Celtic of all time. Because of Bobby Orr, Ray Boruque (who arrived in Boston the same year as Larry) could only ascend as high as second on the list of great Boston Bruins, even if Bourque played twice as long. David Ortiz may have three more World Series rings than Ted Williams, but if you think Ortiz means more to the history of the game and to the Red Sox, you’re lying to yourself. I wrote last month, that Tom Brady is that guy for the Patriots. Like Steve Young following Joe Montana, no Patriots quarterback will ever be better than Brady. I am convinced of that.

Salt Lake City only has one major professional sports team, and they have never won a title. Despite that, John Stockton and Karl Malone have firmly established themselves as the best that franchise will ever have. You can win as many championships as you like, but the Utah Jazz will never have a duo like that again. Stockton is the NBA’s all time leader in assists, and Malone is second only to Kareem Abdul-Jabbar on the all time scoring list. Stockton is considered the best pure point guard in NBA history (if you’re 6’9″ and played center in a Finals game like Magic Johnson did, you’re in a category of your own), but the battle to be Utah’s second best point guard is ongoing.

Deron Williams was an All-Star who took the Jazz to the playoffs a few times before forcing Jerry Sloan into retirement and getting traded to the (then) New Jersey Nets. The future of Utah Jazz basketball is now in the hands of an Australian teenager named Dante Exum. Exum was a coveted prospect in the 2014 NBA Draft, but was also a giant mystery. Sure, his highlights looked impressive, and his father was teammates with Michael Jordan at North Carolina, but Dante didn’t play college basketball. It’s difficult to determine how good someone will be in the NBA if they look good against overseas talent.

Then this .gif happened.

Exum blocked Williams in impressive fashion in a game between Utah and Brooklyn. The two were never teammates, and neither team is going anywhere this year, but this is the kind of thing people will remember if the Jazz become the powerhouse they were in the mid-90s. The best Jazz team ever had the misfortune of peaking during Jordan’s second three-peat, and were victims of some of the GOAT’s Greatest Moments of All Time. Maybe things will be different for Dante Exum.

Excitement in San Diego

This Major League Baseball offseason has been terrific for trades and player movement, to the point that baseball is taking up time in the 24 hour sports news cycle during football/basketball/hockey season the way the NBA was during the middle of the summer when baseball was the only major sport playing games. The eager waiting of baseball fans everywhere for Jon Lester’s free agency decision did not have the ESPN flair of LeBron’s decision to take his talents to South Beach in the summer of 2010, but jokes about waiting for a new Pope, and anticipating red smoke if the lefty ace chose Boston and blue smoke if he picked Chicago (or orange smoke if he decided to take his talents to San Francisco, but they were out of the running before the Red Sox and Cubs) dominated Reddit and Twitter, and did not seem that far off from the reality of the situation. Not every offseason is this exciting, but 2014 has not disappointed, unless you’re a fan of the Orioles or Athletics (but even then, A’s fans must be used to Billy Beane’s wheeling and dealing by now, and they’ll be contending again soon enough).

One team that usually flies under the radar during the winter, and rarely makes waves during the regular season has been right in the thick of it this offseason, however. The San Diego Padres might not be good this year, but there’s more to talk about with that club than there has been in a while.

The Padres are one of those teams that you might forget are in Major League Baseball if you follow an American League team, and they’re not on the inter-league schedule. In recent years, the National League West has been dominated by the San Francisco Giants, and Los Angeles Dodgers, but the Arizona Diamondbacks (who beat the New York Yankees in seven games in 2001) and the Colorado Rockies (who actually beat the Padres in a one game playoff before eventually getting swept by the Red Sox in 2007) have both been to the World Series since Bruce Bochy, Trevor Hoffman and the late great Tony Gwynn led them to a National League Pennant in 1998, before being swept by the juggernaut Yankees. These days, Gwynn is in Cooperstown, but gone well before his time, and Bochy and Hoffman appear to be headed there eventually, with Bochy the skipper behind three World Series winning teams in the last five years, and Hoffman getting a new award for the National League’s best closer named in his honor, but none of them are doing anything to help the Padres right now.

The plight of small market teams in baseball is reflected in San Diego’s baseball club. Adrian Gonzalez was a good player for them, but they traded him to Boston in 2011 rather than sign him to an extension or lose him via free agency. This winter, however, the Padres went on the offensive with their trades, acquiring Matt Kemp from the Dodgers, Wil Myers from the Tampa Bay Rays, and Justin Upton from the Atlanta Braves, three outfielders with All-Star caliber bats. They also flipped veteran catcher Ryan Hanigan to the Red Sox for third baseman Will Middlebrooks. This is a low-risk trade that could potentially work well for both teams. Middlebrooks is a young player with plenty of power who gets injured almost as much as he strikes out, but a change of scenery could be good for him, especially since the Red Sox were ready to move on from him with the signing of World Series hero Pablo Sandoval earlier in the offseason. For the Red Sox, Hanigan is a local kid (from Andover, MA) who could play the role of mentor to young catcher Christian Vazquez, and replace David Ross (who signed with the Cubs to catch for Lester) as the team’s backup catcher.

The recurring theme seems to be a change of scenery, and there isn’t much better scenery than San Diego. I was always surprised that San Diego couldn’t attract free agents on its good weather alone, but it is exactly what these players need. Matt Kemp was a fan favorite and a legitimate superstar in Los Angeles, having been a two time All-Star, two time Gold Glover, and a two time Silver Slugger, but is now 30, and has had injury issues, and has fallen out of favor with the Dodgers. It’s interesting to note, though, that both Kemp and Dodgers owner Magic Johnson were mentioned by name in the Donald Sterling tapes, for being people that V. Stiviano had taken pictures with and posted to Instagram against Sterling’s approval. At any rate, it was probably time for Kemp to head south. San Diego should be a good change of pace after playing his entire career with the Dodgers.

Wil Myers was part of a big trade two years ago that sent pitchers James Shields and Wade Davis from the Tampa Bay Rays to the Kansas City Royals. Myers, a top prospect in Kansas City’s farm system was believed to be a steal at the time, although Shields and Davis were a big part of the incredible, improbable, no joke, very exciting run to Game 7 of the World Series that Kansas City went on this past October. Myers was no slouch, either. He won the 2013 American League Rookie of the Year Award with Tampa, and at 24, still has a promising future ahead of him in the game of baseball. It may be a very Boston-centric sports take, but it might do Myers a lot of good to spend less time at Fenway Park. Myers made a costly error at Fenway in the 2013 ALDS, which helped kick off the Red Sox postseason success that year, and in 2014, he collided in the Fenway outfield with Desmond Jennings resulting in a wrist injury that would derail his season (as well as the Rays’ season, which resulted in Tampa trading David Price to the Detroit Tigers, general manager Andrew Friedman leaving to become President of Baseball Operations for the Dodgers, and field manager Joe Maddon leaving to become manager of the Cubs). With the Padres, Myers won’t even have to go to Fenway every season.

Justin Upton is another player who could use a change of scenery because things just weren’t working in Atlanta. The Braves had plenty of bats, but had poor plate approach as a team. Upton and his brother B.J. did not live up to the hype that came with them arriving in Atlanta the same year. After the Braves dealt Jason Heyward to the St. Louis Cardinals, it seemed as if they were ready to blow it up and start rebuilding.

It’s unclear at this time if the Padres will be good, but it’s the first time I can remember that there is buzz around the Padres in the offseason, and it just might lead to regular season buzz. At the very least, the Giants and Dodgers are looking over their shoulders because the division has a chance to be more than just a two team race in 2015.

You stay classy, San Diego.

Homecoming King

When LeBron James infamously “took his talents to South Beach” in the summer of 2010, it was the biggest sports story of the year (in a year with Tiger Woods’ sex scandal and the Giants’ first World Series victory since moving to San Francisco more that half a century earlier, no less) for all the wrong reasons. When LeBron James decided to back the the Cleveland Cavaliers, the team that drafted him and played in his home state of Ohio, in the summer of 2014, it was the biggest sports story of the year for all the right reasons. James is still the best player on the planet, as he was four years ago, but now he has two championship rings, two more MVP awards, and has grown up immensely since ripping Cleveland’s collective heart out on ESPN the way he did. This changes everything.

When LeBron did The Decision, it set a bad precedent for the NBA. Small markets like Cleveland had a short windows to win championships because star players would just leave when they hit free agency. If LeBron, a native of Akron, Ohio, wouldn’t stay in Cleveland, who would? During LeBron’s four years in Miami, the Cavs never made the playoffs, and earned the #1 overall pick three times. LeBron is now returning home, but there is more talent on the roster now than when he left it. He can be the veteran leadership the Kyrie Irving and Andrew Wiggins need, but those guys are good enough that he won’t have to do it all on his own. It’s about time things started to look up for Cleveland.

Even before LeBron went to Miami, Cleveland was a sports punchline in this country. They have not won a championship in any sport since the Browns were NFL Champions (before the Super Bowl Era) in 1964. The Indians last won the World Series in 1947, and the Cavaliers have never won it all. Bill Simmons popularized the phrase “God hates Cleveland” in his columns, and not even the futility of the Chicago Cubs or the Buffalo Bills could top the city of Cleveland. The only time the Cavs got close was in 2007 when a much younger LeBron James took a Cavs team that had no business being there to the NBA Finals, only to get swept by the San Antonio Spurs, the most dominant and most complete team of the current NBA era.

A big part of why LeBron left wasn’t just because the weather was warmer and the taxes were lower in Florida, but in Dwayne Wade and Chris Bosh, James would have the opportunity to play with consistent All-Stat caliber players for the first time in his career. Basketball stars may have the most impact on a team’s success than individual players in any other sport (including quarterbacks in football, but with the possible exception of hockey goalies in certain cases), but even the biggest stars can’t do it alone. It’s still a team game. Michael Jordan had Scottie Pippin, and later Dennis Rodman. Magic Johnson had Kareem Abdul-Jabbar and James Worthy. Larry Bird had Kevin McHale, Robert Parish, Nate “Tiny” Archibald, Dennis Johnson, and Bill Walton as Hall of Fame teammates on championship squads. Tim Duncan had David Robinson, currently has Tony Parker and Manu Ginobili, and Patty Mills and 2014 Finals MVP Kawhi Leonard could very well be in the early stages of Hall of Fame careers as well. LeBron had no one like that in Cleveland for his first seven NBA seasons. The Cavs were one of the most poorly run organizations in basketball who got bailed out by their superstar every year to save face, and I’m still shocked that ex-Cavaliers GM Danny Ferry ever got another front office job (sorry, Atlanta Hawks fans).

Now, LeBron is coming back to make things right. He’s showing the kids of northeast Ohio that it’s not just a place to leave and never come back. He’s finishing what he started where it all began. Nothing like this has ever happened before in basketball, and I’ve been struggling to to find a comparable situation in the other sports. I superstar leaves in free agency, but goes back to the same small market where he started out while he’s still in his prime? The never happens. I’m also thrilled that he’s leaving Miami as much as I’m thrilled he’s returning to Cleveland. For four years the Heat acted like they were this innovative basketball powerhouse with a proud history because of their current success. That team could have happened anywhere, but Dwayne Wade was already in Miami, and he got James and Bosh to join him. Also, their fans were really lame. What kind of hard core fan base leaves early in an NBA Finals game when the team is down by five points, only to have Ray Allen drain a three to force overtime in front of a half-empty arena. Cleveland may not be a basketball town the way Boston or New York or Los Angeles or San Antonio is, but they’re still great fans. They keep showing up for the Browns every year. That takes dedication. LeBron is one of the ten best players in NBA history on anyone’s list, and the Cleveland  fans will appreciate him more than Miami ever could.

More than anything else, the Re-Decision has fundamentally changed the way I view LeBron James. I can’t think of an athlete as established as LeBron having public opinion sway this much this late in their career for the better. Usually when there is a change of opinion this dynamic, it’s something like Lance Armstrong’s doping downfall or O.J. Simpson’s murder trial or Pete Rose’s gambling revelations, but this time LeBron changed the narrative on us, and it’s a good thing. The King is coming home, and we are all witness.

Rematch Time

The NBA playoffs have been intriguing and exciting this year, but we’re still down to the last two teams who were the last two teams last year.The Miami Heat look to three-peat while the San Antonio Spurs look for their fifth championship in franchise history, and their fifth championship since drafting Tim Duncan with the #1 overall pick in 1997. As close as last year’s NBA Finals was, this one should be a real thriller.

The NBA is changing. A year ago, David Stern was still in charge of the NBA and Donald Sterling was still the old racist bigot who controls the Los Angeles Clippers. Now Adam Silver has replaced Stern, and Silver has run Sterling out of the NBA, with retired Microsoft CEO Steve Ballmer set to buy the Clippers, but this year’s Finals remains eerily similar to the one from last year. The same storylines apply. The Heat are defending champions, and the Spurs are turning back the clocks. People have been saying that Tim Duncan is too old to carry a team to a title since 2008, but he’s in position to do it again. Coach Pop has been great at getting San Antonio to play smart fundamental basketball, and it starts with their star big man.

For the Heat, the chance at a three-peat can shut critics up once and for all. Sure, the leaguewide competition flattened when LeBron James, Dwayne Wade, and Chris Bosh teamed up in South Beach in the summer of 2010, but to their credit, they’ve executed on their end when it mattered. You might not like what they did, and you may think it has made the NBA less interesting (I certainly do), but it’s still impressive. It will be interesting to see how long they can sustain this level of success with younger star players knocking at the door and the level of competition finally starting to rise again in the NBA. Kobe and Shaq have a three-peat on their resume with the Los Angeles Lakers. Michael Jordan and Scottie Pippin have two separate three-peats on theirs with the Chicago Bulls. Phil Jackson has three three-peats as coach of the Lakers and Bulls, and would have had another if it weren’t for those meddling Celtics in 2008. This is the chance for LeBron, Wade, and Bosh to join that elite company.

Duncan and the Spurs have never been repeat champions, but their legacies also have the chance to go from great to epic with a win in the 2014 Finals. Five titles would give Duncan as many as Magic Johnson and Kobe Bryant and more than Shaq or Larry Bird. The last time Duncan won a championship was in 2007, in a four game sweep of the Cleveland Cavaliers and some kid named LeBron James. That was the first time LeBron fell short in the playoffs. The older generation of NBA superstars: Duncan, Paul Pierce, Kevin Garnett, Kobe Bryant, and Dirk Nowitzki, were the obstacles in the road on LeBron”s way to becoming the best player in basketball. It seems now that everyone else is either too young or too old to match LeBron right now, but Duncan wants to prove me wrong, I’m sure. Personally, I would love to see him do it, and he has the best chance of anyone to unseat the Miami Heat.

The Complicated Legacy of David Stern

Today, David Stern is retiring from his job as the commissioner of the National Basketball Association after 30 years on the job. Stern is leaving the NBA in a much better position than he found it, and he has done more to grow the game of basketball than any of the other three current league commissioners have for their respective sports, but David Stern’s NBA has a lot of room for improvement.

For one thing, this graphic from a game the other night does a great job of quantifying Stern’s impact on the NBA. The games were aired in two countries in 1984 (U.S. and Canada, I’m assuming) while they can be seen in 215 countries today. Under David Stern, the NBA has passed the NHL and MLB to become the second most popular professional sports league after the NFL, and the game of basketball has given soccer a legitimate run for its money internationally. He took a league with a serious drug problem and image problem and has transformed it into one with more marketable stars than any other. Larry Bird. Magic Johnson. Michael Jordan. Kareem Abdul-Jabbar. Kevin McHale. Robert Parish. James Worthy. Julius Erving. Scottie Pippin. Isiah Thomas. Clyde Drexler. Charles Barkley. Karl Malone. John Stockton. Hakeem Olajuwon. Patrick Ewing. Kobe Bryant. Shaquille O’Neal. Gary Payton. Reggie Miller. David Robinson. Tim Duncan. Chris Webber. Dirk Nowitzki. Steve Nash. Paul Pierce. Kevin Garnett. Ray Allen. Jason Kidd. LeBron James. Dwayne Wade. Carmelo Anthony. Yao Ming. Pau Gasol. Dwight Howard. Kevin Durant. Russell Westbrook. James Harden. Kevin Love. Steph Curry. And the list goes on. On one hand, he caught lightning in a bottle when he inherited the Magic Johnson/Larry Bird rivalry, which had already revived college hoops and was about to created a showdown for the ages with the 1984 Finals, but Stern deserves a lot of credit for keeping that momentum going for three decades.

Allowing NBA players to participate in the Olympics is perhaps the biggest factor in growing the game. The 1992 USA “Dream Team” is the greatest basketball roster ever assembled, and their dominance in Barcelona inspired a generation of international stars. In the 2012 Olympics, the United States still won Olympic Gold, but the competition was much stiffer because basketball has grown so much in countries like Spain, Germany, France, Argentina, and Turkey.

The NBA’s star power is also part of the NBA’s flaw. Too much emphasis is placed on the achievements of the individual in what is supposed to be a team game. David Stern’s NBA is a league where star players get the benefit of the doubt from referees, because an awesome dunk won’t get played on SportsCenter if he gets called for traveling while driving to the hoop. If star players foul out, they won’t be able to make it exciting at the end. The disparity between the stars and the guys who have to work hard to get the last spot on the bench is greater in the NBA than it is in every other sport. Months after becoming commissioner, he got his first conspiracy theory in the 1984 NBA Finals. Larry Bird told Dan Shaughnessy of The Boston Globe that David Stern wanted a Game 7, so the officials called Game 6 in the Lakers’ favor. That’s a pretty harsh accusation, and Stern would later develop a reputation for fining player and coaches who question the integrity of the officiating (which happens all the time), but Larry Legend was never fined for those comments.

The C’s ended up winning Game 7, but David Stern’s NBA has gone on to have more conspiracy theories than the NFL, NHL, and MLB combined. In the 2010 playoffs, the officiating was awful. The NBA was still only a few years removed from a serious betting scandal involving a referee, and it seemed that every other day, Phil Jackson, Doc Rivers, and Stan Van Gundy, the three best coaches in the tournament, were getting fined for second guessing the officiating. It seemed like Stern and the NBA had something to hide. The other three leagues have their flaws, but sometimes it seems like the NBA is trying to be more like pro wrestling than a real sport. At least pro wrestling is honest about what the product is, and not trying to be a legitimate sports league.

Less than a third of the teams in the NBA won championships in the 30 years Stern was at the helm. The other three leagues have all had at least half their teams win in that same time span. It’s become a league where you need at least two or three Hall of Fame caliber superstars to win a title, and those guys don’t grow on trees. Every year, there are maybe five or six teams with a real chance to win it all. Those odds make it hard to stay interested in basketball. Even in Boston, where the Celtics had been a contender for the last six years, fans saw the Bruins and Red Sox build championship teams and the Patriots reach a Super Bowl since the Celtics last reached the Finals in 2010. Rebuilding in the NBA can take decades, and there’s not guaranteed formula for success. I would like to see an NBA with a greater emphasis on the team, a more level playing field, and more exciting competition.

Now it’s Adam Silver’s turn to run the NBA. David Stern did some great things for the league, but it’s time for a new voice for the future. I don’t know much about Adam Silver (in fact, I have to consult Google a lot because I frequently get him confused with Nate Silver), but I’m excited to see what direction the NBA takes in the coming years. David Stern built the NBA into a powerhouse, but now it’s time to legitimize the business.

Dodgers Spend Big…Again

The Los Angeles Dodgers have signed ace pitcher Clayton Kershaw to a record setting seven year deal worth $215 million. Kershaw is a great pitcher, but this isn’t the first enormous deal the Dodgers have taken on since the partnership led by Magic Johnson purchased the team. Kershaw is the face of the franchise, and the best pitcher in Dodger Blue since Sandy Koufax, and only 25 years old, but they’re already playing Josh Beckett, Carl Crawford, Adrian Gonzalez, and Zack Greinke big money to play in LA. Paying Kershaw was the right thing to do, but what will happen when the money runs out?

I get what Magic Johnson is trying to do. The legendary Los Angeles Lakers point guard is trying to transform the Dodgers into baseball’s version of the Lakers. The  New York Yankees have been that team for generation after generation, but the Bronx Bombers are currently being held hostage by expensive contracts for players over 30. The Dodgers would be a breath of fresh air for baseball with their classic blue caps, irrational swagger, and west coast attitude. They have a high payroll and a history and tradition of success, but have not been to the World Series since they defeated the Oakland A’s in 1988. Since then, their rival San Francisco Giants have reached the World Series twice, and have won their first two World Series titles since the Giants and Dodgers moved to the west coast together in 1958. The Dodgers are relevant again, but they haven’t broken through.

Johnson gained a lot of talent in the summer of 2012 when he took Beckett, Crawford, and Gonzalez off the Red Sox’ hands. It meant resetting the plans for the franchise for Boston, and it meant the expectations to win now for the Dodgers. The Dodgers got off to a slow start in 2013, and manager Don Mattingly’s job appeared to be in jeopardy. Even with Kershaw and all that surrounding talent, the Dodgers looked really bad before a Cuban born catalyst named Yasiel Puig got the offense going and made the Dodgers more exciting than they had been in years. The momentum carried them to the NLCS, where they were were defeated by the St. Louis Cardinals, but it was a fun ride while it lasted. I don’t expect the Giants to be as bad as they were this year, so I don’t expect the Dodgers to be quite as good in 2014, either. They have a lot of volatile stars who explode when the team is hot, but check out when things go south. Kershaw is the consistent one on the team, but he’s just one guy and he only plays every five days. At some point, the Dodgers will hit the limits of their spending capacity, and they would like to win it all before then. The Red Sox dumped their overpaid players on the Dodgers in 2012, and won the World Series in 2013, so the pressure is already there to have success from that particular trade. Bringing back Kershaw is the right thing to do, but the Dodgers need to win soon or fans will be calling for Magic’s head, Mattingly’s head, and running these highly paid players out of town. Or maybe they won’t. It’s LA, not Boston, New York or Philly.