Tagged: Los Angeles Lakers

As Durant Goes, So Goes the NBA

 

Image result for kevin durant

The 2016-17 NBA season has been the Year of Kevin Durant, ever since all of basketball, from the front offices to to the players to the fans to social media, held its collective breath last July 4th weekend as he decided to sign with the Golden State Warriors. For a weekend, The Hamptons was the center of the sports universe, and everything since has been in reaction to KD joining forces with a team that won a record 73 games last year.

  • Russell Westbrook is playing out of his mind this season because he’s mad at Durant.
  • The Boston Celtics made their biggest free agent signing ever with Al Horford because they missed on Durant.
  • What are the Washington Wizards supposed to do now that they had hoped to sign Kevin Durant, being the team from his hometown and all, but could not even get a meeting with him?
  • How far have the Lakers really fallen now that they could not get a meeting with Durant, and they get meetings with everyone because they’re the Lakers?
  • The Oklahoma City Thunder had three of the five best players in the NBA (Durant, Westbrook, and James Harden, with the other two top-five players being LeBron James and Steph Curry) at the beginnings of their careers, and now only have one. Are they now officially this generation’s version of the Shaq and Penny Orlando Magic that were super fun for a few years, but were gone before we could appreciate them and never won a title?
  • Sure, the San Antonio Spurs will be good because they are always good, but in their first year without Tim Duncan, do they even have a chance against this Warriors team?
  • Sure, the Houston Rockets will be interesting because they own the statistical darlings corner of the NBA and are the Oakland A’s of basketball, and the collaboration of GM Daryl Morey, newly hired head coach Mike D’Antoni, and star James Harden (who made the conversion from shooting guard to point guard this season and got even better) might even make them great, but can they hang with this Warriors team?
  • Given the last two bullet points, are we destined (or doomed, depending on how you look at it) for a third straight Warriors/Cavs NBA Finals and the other 28 teams are merely bystanders in this inevitability?

That last bullet point was occupying my mind when I wrote about Durant-to-the-Warriors last July, and that still may very well be the end result of the Year of Durant, but the second tier contenders have been compelling this regular season (particularly Boston, Toronto, Washington, Houston, San Antonio, Oklahoma City, and Utah) and even teams that are not competing this year are made compelling by the bountiful crop of young talent in the Association from Kristaps Poszingis in New York, to Joel “The Process” Embiid in Philadelphia (whom the Sixers shut down for the rest of the season after appearing in just 31 games, but it was an unforgettable 31 games), Nikola Jokic in Denver, to Andrew Wiggins and Karl-Anthony Towns in Minnesota to Jabari Parker, Thon Maker, and Giannis “The Greek Freak” Antetokounmpo in Milwaukee. The NBA is doing just fine, even if the end result feels inevitable. But just like everything else this season, when a post-trade deadline injury sent shock waves through the NBA, the injury in question was Kevin Durant.

A couple nights ago, playing against the Wizards in his hometown of Washington D.C. for the first time since he deliberately made it clear he did not want to play for his hometown, KD hurt his knee when he collided with teammate Zaza Pachulia. According to Adrian Wojnarowski of The Vertical, Durant could be out for the rest of the regular season, and perhaps longer than that. All of a sudden, things are not as certain as they seemed.

It’s impossible to write the Warriors off completely. They still have Steph Curry, they still have Klay Thompson, and they still have Draymond Green. They still have Steve Kerr as their coach. Those guys made The Finals each of the last two years without Durant, including coming back in a seven game series against Durant and the Thunder in the Western Conference Finals last spring. Even without Durant, their high-end talent in this high-end talent-driven league should make them better than most teams on any given night, but without him, their margin for error narrows significantly. Golden State also lacks the depth they enjoyed in previous seasons. In order to make room for Durant, the Warriors jettisoned Andrew Bogut (whose injury in the Finals was the straw that broke their collective back against Cleveland last spring), Harrison Barnes, and Festus Ezeli. The team they have is still very good, but the relative lack of depth was the risk they had to take by adding Durant to what could already be considered a super-team.

Durant’s injury also gives the Spurs and Rockets a better chance of crashing the party. I am not saying they are absolutely going to knock off the Warriors now, but this could make Golden State’s road that much more difficult. The Warriors currently sit at #1 in the Western Conference, with a 50-11 record. The Spurs are two and a half games behind them, at 47-13. If San Antonio could steal the #1 seed from Golden State, it would mean the Warriors potentially having to play the Rockets and the Spurs in order to get back to The Finals instead of the Rockets and Spurs having to play each other in the second round, as would happen if the standings remain the same. For Golden State, the possibility of Durant coming back and playing his first minutes in months in a second round playoff series against Houston, who could already pose as a touch match-up for them, is something that would scare me. The Warriors would much rather have San Antonio and Houston cancel each other out and only have to face one of them before their rubber match against LeBron and the Cavaliers. 

I do not wish injury on anyone, and I am also not one to hold it against Kevin Durant for leaving OKC and joining the Warriors rather than beating them, but I have to admit this second half of the NBA regular season is more interesting than I expected, all because it is the Year of Kevin Durant.

The Model Franchise

With free agent forward LaMarcus Aldridge agreeing to a four year, $80 million contract with the San Antonio Spurs after playing the first nine years of his NBA career with the Portland Trail Blazers, the biggest question of the summer in the NBA has been answered. Historically, the Spurs have not been the biggest players in this month of the NBA calendar, but this year, they hit a home run where the Lakers, Knicks, Bulls, and Heat struck out.

The Spurs are still the best. Generally speaking, if the Spurs do it, it’s probably the right move. Even in a year when they didn’t make it out of the first round of the playoffs, they’re winners, with former Popovich assistant Mike Budenholzer won the Coach of the Year Award as head coach of the Atlanta Hawks and former Spurs player Steve Kerr led the Golden State Warriors to their first NBA Title in 40 years. They haven’t missed the playoffs since drafting Tim Duncan in 1997, and by adding Aldridge, their future looks as bright as ever with Duncan heading into his 19th NBA season.

I love that Aldridge apparently met with the Los Angeles Lakers, the Lakers thought they nailed their pitch to LMA, while Aldridge left the meeting no longer interested on the Lakers. Aldridge isn’t interested in the showbiz aspect LA has to offer. He’s not interested in being anyone’s co-pilot or getting tripped by a billionaire TV writer sitting courtside. He wants to win, and if going home to Texas wasn’t enough incentive, getting to play for the best coach in basketball (and one of the five best of all time), helping to put the Spurs over the top in their quest for a sixth championship, and being the eventual replacement for Duncan certainly was. I love everything about this move. The Spurs have never been big players in free agency because they haven’t needed to be.They drafted David Robinson with the #1 overall pick in 1988 (despite the fact that he wouldn’t be able to play for at least two years to fulfill his military service requirement) and Duncan with the #1 overall pick in 1997. They have been the masters of finding great value late in the first round (or the second round, in the case of Manu Ginobili, who was taken with the #57 overall pick in 1999), and Popovich and R.C. Buford have been great at finding key role players through trades.This year’s two top free agents (excluding LeBron James and Dwayne Wade, who opted out of their contracts, but are in all likelihood staying with their respective teams, but leveraging as much money as they can as the salary cap goes up), Aldridge and Marc Gasol (all signs point to Gasol staying in Memphis, and if he moves, that will be the biggest shock of the summer) are both star players that would make great Spurs. They are versatile, unselfish, ringless, experienced, and hungry. It has never been a better time for San Antonio to dabble in the free agency game.

Duncan turned 39 in April, and Ginobili will turn 38 later this month. The window is closing for those guys, but the outlook for the Spurs is as strong as ever with Aldridge, Danny Green, and Kawhi Leonard, who just turned 24 and already has a Finals MVP on his mantle at home. The key to Red Auerbach’s Celtics was always finding the next guys. Havlicek came after Cousy, Cowens came after Russell, and there was one year that Bird and Cowens spent together before Cowens retired and Robert Parish and Kevin McHale showed up. The other recent dominant teams in the NBA, the Chicago Bulls and LA Lakers, blew things up before they got better. The Bulls especially, by letting Scottie Pippin walk in free agency and pushing Phil Jackson out, it made Michael Jordan’s decision to retire that much easier. San Antonio didn’t let that happen. Duncan and Ginobili aren’t even gone yet (although Manu hasn’t officially committed to next season yet), and they’re already building for the future while competing in the moment. It’s not easy to pull off, but it looks like it has.

Portland dies of dysentery. As exciting as LMA joining forces with Duncan and Coach Pop is, this summer is devastating for Blazers fans. They signed point guard Damian Lillard to a contract extension, but their other four starters, Aldridge (signed with San Antonio), Wesley Matthews (signed with the Dallas Mavericks), Robin Lopez (signed with the New York Knicks), and Nicolas Batum (traded to the Charlotte Hornets), are gone. It was fun while it lasted. This team looked like a legit championship contender six months ago, and has now been dismantled. The injury to Wesley Matthews might go down as one of the biggest “what ifs” in the history of sports. They were holding their own in a tough Western Conference, but one injury to a starter showed the world just how fragile ecosystem of their rotation really was. A year ago, it felt like a long shot to for Aldridge to leave Portland, but the way things fell apart showed him and his teammates just how far off they really were. They have some rebuilding to do, but they’re not the only ones in the NBA in that boat right now.

Right now, the San Antonio Spurs are the model franchise in North American professional sports. The New England Patriots are defending Super Bowl Champions, but are in the midst of a phony controversy in their joke of a league.My Patriots fan bias is outweighed by the incompetence of the NFL’s commissioner, and they’re not on the level of the Spurs. Neither are the Lakers. Neither are the Canadiens. Neither are the Red Wings. Neither are the Yankees. Neither are the St. Louis Cardinals, who find themselves being investigated by the FBI. The San Francisco Giants and Chicago Blackhawks have emerged as dynasties in their respective sports after ending championship droughts in 2010, but neither has done it for as long as the Spurs have. Tim Duncan, Manu Ginobili, Tony Parker, and Coach Pop have accomplished something truly special, as the greatest team in the post-Jordan NBA, and with the signing of Aldridge this summer, there is no reason why it should end any time soon.

Edit: I wrote this post before David West also agreed to join the Spurs. Another good veteran player who wants to win, and based on reputation, is a great fit in San Antonio. The Spurs are the best, but we already knew that.