Tagged: Jason Kidd

OKC Adds Melo, NBA Arms Race Escalates

The 2017 NBA offseason is the gift that keeps on giving. The Indiana Pacers trading Paul George to the Oklahoma City Thunder was not enough. The Los Angeles Clippers trading Chris Paul to the Houston Rockets was not enough. The Chicago Bulls trading Jimmy Butler to the Minnesota Timberwolves was not enough. Gordon Hayward signing with the Boston Celtics was not enough. The Cleveland Cavaliers trading Kyrie Irving to the Celtics for Isaiah Thomas was not enough.

The Los Angeles Lakers getting fined for tampering because Magic Johnson talked about Paul George on a talk show was not enough. Kevin Durant using a fake Twitter account to trash Russell Westbrook and Billy Donovan was not enough. Even this morning, the President of the United States uninviting Steph Curry to the White House when Curry said he did not want to attend, followed by LeBron James calling the POTUS a bum on Twitter (and in turn, causing “u bum” to trend) was not enough.

Adrian Wojnarowski of ESPN (which is still weird to say after all his years at Yahoo Sports) reported last night that New York Knicks forward Carmelo Anthony had added Cleveland and Oklahoma City to the list of teams he wished to be traded, and this afternoon, Woj reported that the Knicks had traded Melo to the Thunder for Enes Kanter, Doug McDermott, and a 2018 2nd round draft pick. A summer after losing Kevin Durant to free agency, they have a big three of Westbrook, George, and Anthony, and that is going to be very, very interesting.

Credit must be given to OKC GM Sam Presti, who has made his share of mistakes (most notably trading James Harden when he did, for what he got), and the loss of Durant was something that could have sunk the franchise into a decade of futility, but he acted instead of letting it happen and letting Westbrook leave. There is very little chance of George staying long-term, but the newly created trifecta could be enough to win now if things break the right way. These trades are bold moves for a small market franchise that has no chance of getting players of that caliber as free agents. 

I don’t know if this is going to work. I thought the Timberwolves would be a playoff team last year, and I thought the Brooklyn Nets would contend when they traded for Paul Pierce and Kevin Garnett, and Jason Kidd had never coached and NBA game before that season. What I do know is Westbrook and George got their teams to the playoffs last year as lone superstars, and that Melo best thrives when he does not have to be the #1 guy, like in the Olympics. With Russ and George already there, OKC is a better than average opportunity for the 33 year old Melo to become Olympic Melo once again. Does that put them ahead of the Spurs? Probably. The Rockets? Maybe. The defending champion Golden State Warriors? Probably not, but I would like to see them try.

I have been critical of Carmelo Anthony in the past, as many NBA fans have been over the years. I have never been a huge fan of his game, but the more I think about it, the issue I mostly had was the way teams play when Melo is their #1 option. He was The Guy in Denver, and again in New York (Linsanity notwithstanding), but for all the criticism of his selfish play, that criticism could not fairly extend beyond the basketball court. Melo is charitable, and one of the more socially aware NBA players in this new age of athlete activism. Just yesterday, he set up a donation page on The Players’ Tribune for hurricane relief for Puerto Rico. He may not have been the guy you want to build a championship team around like LeBron or Dwyane Wade were, but in a world with a lot of legitimately evil people catching breaks and moving up, Carmelo Anthony being in a better basketball situation than the comically dysfunctional Knicks is hardly the worst thing that can happen.

Last season, one of the biggest criticisms of the NBA was the inevitability of outcome. From the beginning of July, everyone knew the Warriors would meet the Cavaliers in the Finals for the third straight year. This year, the Warriors are not going anywhere, and the Cavs will be good so long as they have LeBron, but teams around them–the Thunder, the Rockets, and the Celtics, all got more interesting. Will interesting be good enough? We will find out soon enough.

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The Best Deal Never Made

Dallas Mavericks owner Mark Cuban is a shrewd businessman. He’s outspoken. He is one of the biggest personalities in the NBA, but has never played or coached a game. He is polarizing, and he is full of himself. He loves to quote Ayn Rand almost as much as he likes feeling like the smartest person in the room all the time. When the Mavericks failed to land free agent All-Star point guard Deron Williams in 2012 because Cuban skipped a chance to meet with Williams to film an episode of Shark Tank, basketball writers around the country and around the world jumped at the chance to poke fun at the Internet billionaire, but looking back on it, not signing Deron Williams was the smartest thing Cuban could have done.

This isn’t a knock on Deron Williams (although it is a little bit). He’s a very good player, but he’s very well paid in an era where everyone seems to have at least a pretty good point guard. Williams signed a five year $98.7 million contract to remain with the Nets as they planned to move from New Jersey to Brooklyn. Only Chris Paul of the Los Angeles Clippers, who signed a five year $107 million contract the following summer, makes more money from the point guard position than Williams. Williams and Paul came into the NBA in the same year (Williams was drafted third by the Utah Jazz, and Paul was drafted fourth by the New Orleans Hornets in 2005), and for many years, “who’s better: Williams or Paul?” was a serious debate among basketball fans, but no longer. In the years since Williams re-signed with the Nets and the Nets moved to Brooklyn, Williams has become stagnant, battled injury, and his team has underachieved, while Chris Paul is the best player on one of the best teams in the NBA’s best conference.

The red flags with Williams were apparent before Cuban had the chance to sign him, but people were willing to overlook them because of his talent. It took him a while to earn a “coach killer” reputation, but once he got it, he really got it. In 2011, his falling out with Jazz head coach (and Hall of Famer) Jerry Sloan forced Sloan into midseason retirement. Two weeks later, Williams was traded to the New Jersey Nets. After Sloan, he played under Tyrone Corbin (briefly before getting traded out of Utah), Avery Johnson, P.J. Carlesimo, Jason Kidd, and now Lionel Hollins. Six head coaches have attempted to coach Deron Williams in the last four calendar years, and in that time, Williams has been leapfrogged by Steph Curry, Damian Lillard, Kyle Lowry, John Wall, Goran Dragic. Russell Westbrook, and Kyrie Irving (if not, more players) in the hierarchy of point guards in the NBA. Even without the “coach killer” reputation he earned when he forced out a coach who had been in the same city since 1988, he it’s a bad contract two years later because the NBA is in the midst of a point guard renaissance and the supply of good point guards is so great, it would be silly to pay someone like Williams that much.

Not having to pay Williams has allowed Dallas to do other things to rebuilt and retool. Since Cuban’s infamous scheduling conflict, the Mavs have added Tyson Chandler (who was a key part of their 2011 championship squad, and would be a surefire Hall of Famer if he had played his whole career for Rick Carlisle or alongside Dirk Nowitzki), Chandler Parsons, Monta Ellis, and Rajon Rondo, while also being able to keep Dirk Nowitzki. While their defense is lacking, the Dallas Mavericks run a simple, yet ingenious offense that works beautifully with the personnel and the coach they have. Any variable, like Williams dribbling too much, or butting heads with head coach Rick Carlisle, and Dallas would not be as efficient as they are now. Meanwhile, the Brooklyn Nets have too much money tied up in Williams, Joe Johnson, and Brook Lopez, and they are struggling just to stay in the playoff picture in the less than loaded Eastern Conference. Williams is no longer the impact player he was in Utah, and the Nets do not have the flexibility to build around him. They also cannot build through the draft because of trades that send their first round picks to the Atlanta Hawks and Boston Celtics (Danny Ainge is a genius!) for years to come. They have no present, and no future, but their payroll is that of a championship contender.

This time, Mark Cuban got the last laugh. He actually was the smartest guy in the room, and he can write another book or perhaps pitch another reality show from the brilliance of this business non-transaction. Like him or hate him, he nailed it. Wouldn’t it be fun if he was also a hockey or baseball owner? He’s tried to but the Pittsburgh Penguins, Chicago Cubs, Los Angeles Dodgers, and New York Mets in the past. I can only imagine what he’d be like in the baseball hot stove league. It would be amazing, and it would be insufferable, and baseball needs a villain owner now that George Steinbrenner is gone. I’m on board.

No Love Lost

I spent all of the 2013-14 basketball season thinking the Boston Celtics were poised to make a big splash this summer. It was a strange season, the first since 2006-07 that the C’s weren’t a playoff team, let alone a legitimate championship contender, and I thought it wouldn’t be long before they would be back in the mix. Instead, they fell to #6 in the draft lottery, and did not have enough assets to acquire Kevin Love from the Minnesota Timberwolves, who was traded to the Cleveland Cavaliers this week in exchange for 2014 #1 overall pick Andrew Wiggins and 2013 #1 overall pick Anthony Bennett. It might be a while before the Celtics can compete with Cleveland, Chicago, and the best teams of the West again, but it’s not all bad.

There were no fireworks this summer in the way that Celtics owner Wyc Grousbeck had hoped for during the season, but there were quite a few mildly exciting things that happened for the team. First off, the Celtics unveiled a new alternate logo, pictured in the top left corner of this article.

The green and white reminds me of the older version of the leprechaun logo that the Celtics used in the Larry Bird Era, and isn’t as busy as the newer one that debuted around the same time the team hired Rick Pitino in the mid-90s. Here are the two logos side by side:

The new logo is a sleeker, cleaner take on the classic Lucky the Leprechaun design that was first drawn up by Red Auerbach’s brother. It looks a little a lot cartoonish, and I’m thinking of referring to it as the “Bugs Bunny Celtics Logo” in future blog posts, but many of the best logos in sports are shamelessly cartoonish. That’s another article for another day.

The other big uniform change the Celtics are making this year is that the road green jerseys will now say “BOSTON” instead of “CELTICS” like they did back in the 50s and early 60s.

Again, I’m a big fan of the change. The Celtics have the best uniforms in the NBA in my opinion, and the great thing about that organization is that if they ever want to retool their look, they can just borrow from the past. Many teams in all four sports continue to change their color schemes and completely overhaul their logos, but the Celtics will never need to do that. Their identity is secure.

Another exciting thing to happen off the court for the Celtics this summer was Brian Scalabrine’s homecoming announcement. While the parody of LeBron James’ Sports Illustrated article is funny enough in and of itself, the fact that White Mamba is returning to the Celtics is welcome news. Scal belongs in Boston. Even if he’s just a broadcaster (and filling the shoes of Celtics legend and color commentator Tommy “That is bogus!!!” Heinsohn during road games) for CSSNE, it’s great to see him as part of the Celtics family once again.

Scalabrine was a fan favorite during the New Big Three Era where he carved out a role as the big redheaded guy in the huddle and the last guy on the bench, draining threes in games that Paul Pierce, Ray Allen, and Kevin Garnett had already put away. After the C’s devastating seven game defeat at the hands of the Lakers in 2010, Scal signed with the Chicago Bulls, joining former Celtics assistant coach Tom Thibodeau, who had been hired as Chicago’s new head coach. He played a couple more seasons in the same role he had in Boston, but in a show that starred Derrick Rose and Joakim Noah instead of Pierce, Allen, and KG. This past season, he served as an assistant coach under Mark Jackson for the Golden State Warriors, but was reassigned towards the end of the season. After another early playoff exit, the Warriors fired Jackson and overhauled the basketball operation for the new coach Steve Kerr.

When it became apparent that Scalabrine would be looking for work, and that the Celtics might not be able to accomplish as much as they were hoping this summer, the guys from the Toucher and Rich show on 98.5 The Sports Hub decided to write a song to raise awareness and get Danny Ainge’s attention. Whether that song helped the cause or not, Brian Scalabrine is a Celtic again, and the world is better for it.

As for the changes the Celtics have made on the court, I think they drafted as well as they could with the #6 and #17 picks, acquiring Marcus Smart from Oklahoma State and James Young from Kentucky. They also signed former #2 overall pick Evan Turner, who played for the Philadelphia 76ers and Indiana Pacers last season. Those are three young players who still have plenty of upside. It will be interesting to see who stays in the Celtics’ long term plans among the “gluttony of guards” as Cedric Maxwell called on the night of the NBA Draft. Between Rajon Rondo, Avery Bradley (who signed a four year deal this summer to stay in Boston), Smart, Young, Turner, and Phil Pressey, that’s a lot of small talent.

The Celtics still have Kelly Olynyk, Jared Sullinger, Jeff Green, and Brandon Bass coming back for forwards, as well. Sullinger showed us a lot in his second year, after being limited by a season ending back injury and the limited amount of minutes Doc Rivers gave to young players as a rookie. Olynyk had a strong finish to his rookie season, finding a bit of a scoring touch by season’s end, and hopefully he can build upon that in 2014-15. Head coach Brad Stevens has a better roster to work with than he did his first year with the Celtics, and now the questions surrounding the Celtics should be less about draft position and more about playoff position.

The Eastern Conference is not very good. There is a reason the Miami Heat represented the East in the NBA Finals four straight years, and it’s not just because of LeBron James. There are a couple of very good teams. The past couple years, it was the Heat and the Indiana Pacers, but with LeBron’s return to Cleveland, and Indiana’s loss of Lance Stephenson in free agency to the Charlotte Hornets (yes, they’re the Hornets again!) and the loss of Paul George to a devastating injury in a meaningless game, it’ll be different teams this time around, in all likelihood.

The Chicago Bulls look poised to take the East by storm, with a healthy Derrick Rose coming back, the reigning Defensive Player of the Year in the form of Joakim Noah, and the signing of veteran star Pau Gasol. The Washington Wizards, having signed free agent ex-Celtics Kris Humphries and Paul Pierce to go with a pretty good young core headlined by John Wall and Bradley Beal, could be another legit contender from the East, but after that, it’s wide open…especially in the Atlantic Division.

The biggest thing to be excited about with the Celtics is the fact that they play in an absolutely terrible division. Here’s a quick recap of who the C’s are up against for 1st place in the Atlantic and an automatic playoff berth:

The Toronto Raptors finally broke through and made the playoffs last year, but lost to the Brooklyn Nets in the first round. They were the beneficiaries of being in a weak division in a year with six or seven highly intriguing draft prospects, so they won the division by default.

The Brooklyn Nets went all in for the 2013-14 season, but came up way short against Miami in Round 2, and lost their head coach (and perhaps the best player to wear a Nets uniform besides Dr. J), Jason Kidd, when he tried to usurp his own general manager before interviewing for the Milwaukee Bucks’ head coaching job when the position was still filled. Now Kevin Garnett is a year older, and Paul Pierce has taken his talents to the nation’s capital. What a mess

The New York Knicks are the New York Knicks, and not even Phil Jackson can change that. They’re going to keep trying to do their thing, and they’re going to hold out hope that the bright lights of New York and the mystique of Madison Square Garden and the star power of Carmelo Anthony will be enough to lure Kevin Durant to them. As always, they’re the Knicks, so they’ll find a way (or multiple ways) to mess that up.

The Philadelphia 76ers are blatantly tanking for a top five pick in the NBA Draft…again. This is their new thing: lose as much as possible, draft a guy who is hurt and won’t be able to play for a year (Nerlens Noel in 2013, Joel Embiid in 2014), lose some more, get another high pick, and repeat the process until the entire roster is loaded with potential. Wake me up when they start trying.

With Coach Stevens, and the assemblage of talent already on the roster, the Celtics have as good a chance as anyone to make the playoffs. Once they’re there, the probably won’t win it all, but they can at least make it interesting. In Adam Silver’s NBA, the playoffs have already become less formulaic than they were for 30 years under David Stern, and maybe, just maybe, anything is possible. ANYTHING IS POSSIBLE!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!! We’ll just have to wait and see what that anything will be.

Worth A Thousand Words – Former Rivals Time Vortex

I like to think that Paul Pierce and Jason Kidd were looking into the future and seeing the 2013-14 NBA season unfold when this photo was taken. It was a tough year to be a Celtics fan, seeing Pierce and Kevin Garnett playing for the Nets, and playing for longtime rival Kidd. Pierce and Garnett (especially Garnett) are not the players they used to be, and Kidd is not nearly as good at coaching as he was at playing.

Growing up, I couldn’t stand Jason Kidd. When he was the star point guard for the New Jersey Nets, he kept getting in the Celtics’ way. He was an easy guy to hate, and it felt weird rooting for him because he was coaching Paul Pierce. Now that that season is over, and the (now Brooklyn) Nets lost to Miami, and Pierce is set to become a free agent, it’s not so bad. The Celtics got three first round draft picks in exchange for one year of Paul Pierce and a beyond washed up KG.

Surviving the NBA Playoffs as a Celtics Fan

As a Celtics fan, it’s strange going into the NBA playoffs without a horse in the race. Since the 2007-08 season, the C’s had been a legitimate championship contender, but that changed last summer with the departures of Kevin Garnett, Paul Pierce, and Doc Rivers. The trades that Danny Ainge made sending those guys out of town have helped build the Celtics for the years going forward, but left them as out of the tournament and in the draft lottery in the meantime. I’m not the biggest NBA fan and I’ve been much more excited about the NHL all year, but there are still plenty of narratives to be excited about during the 2014 playoff tournament. As one of the most successful franchises in all of professional sports, and one of the model franchises in the game of basketball along with the Lakers and Spurs, there are plenty of Celtics alumni in key positions around the NBA. The C’s are an organization that takes care of their own, and can get you a good position on another team in you choose to leave. Even though they’re not in it this year, the Celtics’ influence can still be felt on the Association this spring.

Larry Bird’s Indiana Pacers. After a one season hiatus, Larry Bird signed back on as Team President of the Indiana Pacers. Last year, Indiana made it to the Eastern Conference Finals before bowing out to the Miami Heat in seven games. Bird’s team has been a model of how to build through the middle and getting a good roster without tanking a season. Paul George has emerged as a star player in this league, and Lance Stephenson and Roy Hibbert are great players when they’re on their game. The Pacers earned the top seed in the East, because they were determined to have the home court advantage in a rematch with Miami. They struggled out of the gate in Game 1 against the Atlanta Hawks, and if they get upset, Bird might find himself wheeling and dealing to retool in a big way this summer. They’ve built high expectations for themselves, and now is the time to deliver. Frank Vogel, the Pacers coach who previously served as an assistant coach for the Celtics from 2001 to 2004, might find himself in the hot seat if the Indiana ends the season anywhere short of the NBA Finals. The state of Indiana has a long and storied tradition with the game of basketball that predates Indiana State hero Larry Bird by decades, but one thing that has evaded them is an NBA Title. Since started working for the team, the Pacers have been arguably the best run and most successful NBA team that has not won a championship. Now is as good a time as any to make that happen.

  Kevin McHale’s Houston Rockets. McHale did not experience the same level of success as an executive as his former teammates Bird and Ainge, but he is a pretty good coach. His biggest hit when he was running the Minnesota Timberwolves was drafting and developing some high school kid named Kevin Garnett into one of the best players in the history of the NBA. After the Wolves failed to improve after trading KG to the Celtics, McHale got canned and was replaced by Kurt Rambis of all people. Rambis’ failed tenure in Minnesota validated what McHale was able to do, and he’s got the Houston Rockets playing really well now. Rockets GM Daryl Morey, who also has ties to the Celtics organization, made some smart acquisitions trading for James Harden, and bringing in Jeremy Lin and Dwight Howard. This is another example of building without tanking, acquiring assets that can be used to trade for a blue chip player, like the Danny Ainge did to get Ray Allen and Kevin Garnett in 2007, and like he might again this summer if he can pull off a trade for Kevin Love. Houston has their hands full with the Portland Trail Blazers, but they will be contending in the Western Conference for years to come.

Doc Rivers’ Los Angeles Clippers. On one hand it was saddening and baffling to see Doc Rivers leave the Celtics last summer, but the other hand, it was the right move for both Doc and the Celtics. Doc did great things in Boston. In 2008, he coached the C’s to their 17th NBA Title, and their first since 1986. He got Boston, and was one of the powerful voices in Boston sports after last year’s Boston Marathon tragedy, but it was time to go in a different direction. Doc is the kind of coach you get for a team that wants to win a championship now, and that wasn’t going to happen in Boston this year. Brad Stevens is the guy who will get the most out of the young roster, while Doc had value for a team like the Clippers, who are already a playoff team, but their star players like Chris Paul and Blake Griffin need guidance in getting to the next level. This year, the Clips had their best regular season in franchise history. That’s not saying much as Doc went from one of the most successful franchises in all of sports to one of the most historically futile, but he does have them in a good position this year. It’s a strange year in the NBA. The Celtics and Lakers are both missing the playoffs for only the second time in NBA history, and the Clippers are the LA team playing meaningful games in April. The Knicks, Sixers, and Pistons are on the outside looking in as well. The status quo has been thrown out this year. No wonder David Stern left when he did.

Kevin Garnett’s and Paul Pierce’s Brooklyn Nets. Seeing KG and Pierce in a different uniform hurt even more than seeing Doc coaching the Clippers. Both of these guys will have their numbers (5 and 34) in the rafters of the TD Garden someday, and they are still worth rooting for in the playoffs this year despite playing for a division rival. The draft picks the C’s got back in return for their two aging stars are going to make the Celtics better long after their careers are over, and the Nets will have trouble keeping those picks out of the lottery without KG and Pierce, especially given the injury histories of Deron Williams and Brook Lopez. In the meantime, the Nets have an interesting team that had Miami’s number during the regular season. Rookie head coach Jason Kidd has apparently gotten past his early season blunders and Brooklyn could be a surprise team coming out of the East. Another former Celtic, Jason Collins, the NBA’s first openly gay player, is on the Nets, so that’s another reason to root for Brooklyn if you’re a Celtics fan. The Nets are playing to the Toronto Raptors, who are not accustomed to making that playoffs. KG and Paul Pierce have been in this spot before, although they’re wearing different colors this time around. It feels weird rooting for the Nets and rooting for Jason Kidd, but those guys make it okay.

Tom Thibodeau’s Chicago Bulls. Coach Thibs was an assistant coach for the Celtics when they won it all in 2008 and when they made it to a heartbreaking Game 7 against the Lakers in 2010. He’s a defensive genius and was a well respected assistant who never got a head coaching opportunity before the Chicago Bulls came calling. Thibodeau has made the Bulls a consistent contender, even with former MVP point guard Derrick Rose being constantly injured for the last three seasons. While an assistant in Boston, he made the Celtics into the best defensive team in the NBA, and in Chicago, he has made Joakim Noah into the 2014 NBA Defensive player of the year. Thibodeau’s teams have been though a lot, but they never go down without a fight, it seems. They have their hands full with John Wall and the Washington Wizards, but if there’s one thing we’ve come to expect from the Bulls, it’s an honest effort.

Rick Carlisle’s Dallas Mavericks. Carlisle was a reserve for the Celtics when they won their 16th NBA Title in 1986. He retired from playing in 1989, and started his coaching career the following season. He was an assistant coach for the Indiana Pacers under Larry Bird, and later became a head coach for the Detroit Pistons, Pacers, and Dallas Mavericks. When he guided the Mavs to their franchise’s first NBA Title in 2011, he became one of just 11 people to win a championship in the NBA as both a player and as a head coach (that list includes Bill Russell, Phil Jackson, Bill Sharman, Tommy Heinsohn, KC Jones, and Pat Riley that I was able to come up with off the top of my head). Carlisle has quietly become one of the best coaches in the NBA, but his year he’s matched up against the very best in the first round. Dallas is back in the playoffs, but they’re up against one of their Texas rivals, Gregg Popovich and the San Antonio Spurs. The series should be a lot tighter than your typical #1 vs. #8 series.

Brian Scalabrine’s Golden State Warriors. Scal was a fan favorite when he was in Boston, despite being the last guy on the bench when they won it all in 2008. He’s a real character, and is a much smarter basketball guy than a lot of people give him credit. When his playing career ended, Scalabrine became a team broadcaster for the Celtics, filling in for Tommy Heinsohn as the color commentator on TV during road trips. Last summer, Scal scouted and worked out with Kelly Olynyk before the Celtics drafted him, and was considered as an option to replace Doc Rivers before Ainge eventually hired Brad Stevens away from Butler University. After that, Scal took a job as an assistant coach for the Golden State Warriors, working under Mark Jackson. It was reported a few weeks ago, that Scal was getting reassigned by the Warriors, but the Warriors front office wanted to keep him within the organization. If the Dubs have an early playoff exit, it could be the end for Jackson, and Scalabrine could possibly be their next head coach.

The Boston Bruins. Who am I kidding? This is the real answer. If you’re a Celtics fan and you’re wondering what to watch this spring, there is a great hard-nosed hockey team with championship aspirations that plays in the same building as the C’s. In fact, the Bruins own the building and rent it out to the Celtics. They won the President’s Trophy as the best team in the regular season, but have their sights aimed higher than that. Patrice Bergeron should win the Selke Trophy as the NHL’s best defensive forward. Zdeno Chara should win the Norris Trophy as the NHL’s best defenseman. Tuukka Rask should win the Vezina Trophy as the NHL’s best goaltender. What really matters is the Stanley Cup. It’s the best trophy in all of sports, and the Bruins have as good a chance as anyone. They’re playing the Detroit Red Wings in round one, which makes for a classic Original Six match up.

There’s nothing better than playoff hockey, and without the Celtics in the NBA playoffs, it’s the only playoffs in town.

Welcome Home

It finally happened. Kevin Garnett and Paul Pierce returned to Boston wearing different laundry. It was bittersweet, but mostly sweet, to see the reception they got from the crowd. It won’t be the last time they play in Boston, and they will certainly both get their numbers 5 and 34 raised to the TD Garden rafters when it’s all said and done, but the first one is always a shock, even though we knew for six months.

Here is KG’s tribute video, and here is Pierce’s. These are two players who meant so much to the Celtics they needed separate in-game tributes. Larry Bird retired when I was two, so these guys are the two best Celtics I ever remember watching. Pierce was in Boston for a decade before winning in 2008. KG was drafted by Kevin McHale in Minnesota, and was one of my favorite players even before he wore green. When they came together, along with Ray Allen, Doc Rivers, and Rajon Rondo, there was something special from the very first day. The Celtics had three aging veterans who were hungry to win, and they won. The 2008 Celtics were one of the best teams the NBA has ever seen. They played great defense, and played unselfish basketball on both ends of the floor. The became the biggest thing holding LeBron James back from winning titles, and were the toughest match for Kobe Bryant’s Lakers for a six year span.

Even in leaving Boston, Garnett and Pierce were selfless. When Ray Allen left, he joined the Celtics’ biggest rival in the Eastern Conference and gave them nothing in return. KG and Pierce agreed to be traded, and that trade is the foundation for the C’s rebuild. The Brooklyn Nets started off slow, have been hot lately, and could be a contender, but without KG and Pierce, the core of the team is flawed and expensive. When the Celtics start getting draft pics from Brooklyn, the Nets has the chance to be really bad. They are playing out the back nine of their careers in Brooklyn, but they will always be Celtics. Pierce’s pregame interview with Celtics play-by-play announcer Mike Gorman said a lot about what being a Celtics meant to him, and you can tell he still thinks of himself as a Celtic.

My favorite part of last night’s game was when they did the players introductions for the Nets and Kevin and Paul got their big ovations, but as soon as Nets head coach Jason Kidd was announced, the Garden crowd flipped the switch and loudly booed Kidd. Nostalgia is great, and as much as Celtics fans love Kevin Garnett and Paul Pierce, they still have that same amount of hate for longtime rival Kidd. That crowd got it. I hope the crowds at Celtics games continue to have that same level of passion as Danny Ainge works to make them a championship contender again. It can’t happen overnight, but they’re heading in the right direction thanks to #5 and #34.

Worst Week in Boston Sports Part V – No Sleep Till Brooklyn

As if this week couldn’t get any worse, the book closed on the Paul Pierce Era in the history of the Boston Celtics when the Celtics and Brooklyn Nets agreed in principle (the trade can’t be finalized until July 10 per NBA rules) on a trade that would send Paul Pierce, Kevin Garnett, and Jason Terry to Brooklyn in exchange for Kim Kardashian’s ex-husband, a bunch of players I’ve never heard of, and Brooklyn’s 1st round draft picks in 2014, 2016, and 2018. Ultimately, this is a good deal for the Celtics, who need more draft picks to improve their roster and ran the risk of being sentimental and letting The Truth and The Big Ticket retire without getting anything in return. It’s not the Celtics’ job to be sentimental (although they are as an organization, as evidenced by their bajillion retired numbers, but that’s another blog post for another day), but as fans it’s still sad even if it was the right thing to do.

Paul Pierce has been playing for the Celtics since I was in 3rd Grade. He was a key piece in the organization through good times and bad times. Grew up a Lakers fan in Inglewood, but went on to be one of the greatest players ever to wear Celtic Green. He stuck with Boston even after getting stabbed. People across the country found out how great he really was after he started playing with Kevin Garnett and Ray Allen, but Celtics fans knew what he was long before that. He was a good scorer, and underrated defender, and he was never afraid to take the big shot at the end of a game.

Paul Pierce and his new coach Jason Kidd were rivals just two months ago.

Garnett was the guy who changed the culture in Boston back to a winning one. He was drafted by legendary Celtic Kevin McHale, and the two of them are both top five power forwards in the history of the NBA as well as top fifteen (at least) Celtics of all time. McHale, who was the general manager of the Minnesota Timberwolves, traded KG to his former teammate Danny Ainge in Boston, and along with the acquisition of Ray Allen that same summer, the New Big Three Era in Boston began. Pierce, Allen, and Garnett won the NBA title their first year together in 2008, and they should have won a second, but it never happened due to age and injury. Ever since the Celtics lost Game 7 against the Los Angeles Lakers in 2010, fans knew it would only be a matter of time before this day came.

Pierce and Garnett will be joining a Brooklyn team coached by their contemporary and former rival Jason Kidd, who most recently met them in the playoffs this past April as the impossibly old yet surprisingly effective point guard for the New York Knicks. They are joining a talented roster in Brooklyn and have a chance to compete with Miami yet again, but no matter what they do, they will always be Celtics. Garnett said himself that he bleeds green, and they are most definitely the last Celtics ever to wear the numbers 34 and 5. They were such selfless superstars that it’s fitting that their last act as Boston Celtics was getting traded to put the team in a better position to be a contender sooner. Thank, guys! We’ll miss you, but best of luck in Brooklyn. I’ll play you guys out.