Tagged: Chris Paul

Post-Truth, and After-Doc

This was a crazy week in Boston sports, perhaps the craziest since the one when the Bruins lost to Chicago in the Stanley Cup Final, Aaron Hernandez was arrested for murder, and the Celtics traded Kevin Garnett and Paul Pierce to the Brooklyn Nets, or possibly the weekend in October of that same year that had David Ortiz’ ALCS grand slam against the Detroit Tigers and the “Unicorns! Show ponies! Where’s the beef?!” game against the New Orleans Saints. I am just now getting around to writing about what happened this weekend, but for my article on the Patriots comeback in Super Bowl LI, click here, and for my reaction to the Bruins firing longtime head coach Claude Julien and the current direction of the team, click here.

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Like the Bruins, the Celtics had big news this week that was overshadowed by the Patriots’ fifth Super Bowl win, but unlike the Bruins, the Celtics were not trying to bury it. Earlier in the afternoon on Super Bowl Sunday, Paul Pierce played his last game at TD Garden. That’s just how the schedule worked out, as the Los Angeles Clippers only make one trip to Boston the whole season. It was the only time the former team captain and former head coach Doc Rivers would be in front of the Celtics’ crowd in the 2016-17 season, and the 39 year old Pierce has announced that this is his last NBA season.

While Pierce played his last game as a Celtic in 2013, shortly after I launched this blog, and is now in his third team since leaving Boston, he will always be remembered as a Celtic. Fifteen years, ten All-Star appearances, two trips to the NBA Finals, a title, and a Finals MVP is not a bad legacy. Paul Pierce is not the greatest player of his era, and certainly not the greatest Celtic ever, but he will always be my favorite, as I was too young to enjoy the Larry Bird and Kevin McHale teams, let alone Bill Russell, Bob Cousy, John Havlicek, or Dave Cowens.

Maybe an even greater aspect of his legacy, depending on how the next couple of drafts go, is what the Celtics got in return from the Nets when they traded him and KG in the summer of 2013. Brooklyn thought they were building a contender with Pierce, Garnett, Joe Johnson, Brook Lopez, and Deron Williams, but it never got off the ground. The Celtics have already gotten the draft picks that became James Young and Jaylen Brown out of the deal (and Brown has shown true flashes of brilliance at times in his rookie season this year), as well as the ability to swap picks with Brooklyn in 2017 (the Nets are running away the the NBA’s worst record and have yet to record double digit wins) and Brooklyn’s pick in 2018. Pierce only played one season with the Nets, while Garnett was traded to Minnesota in the middle of his second Brooklyn season, and has since retired. Without a doubt, the Celtics won that trade, but just how great a haul that was is still to be determined.

While Pierce did not have a say in getting traded to the Nets (Garnett had a no-trade clause in his contract, while Pierce did not), Doc Rivers was ultimately traded from the Celtics to the Clippers because he did not want to endure another rebuild in Boston. Doc would rather work for a garbage human being of an owner like Donald Sterling (which he did until Sterling was banned from the NBA by Adam Silver in 2014) than have to toil through losing seasons and coach up young talent for a storied organization like the Boston Celtics. On one hand, I do not blame Doc, and the Celtics found a replacement in Brad Stevens who is probably a better coach anyway, and gave Stevens the benefit of adapting to the NBA game without the pressure of needing to win now like fellow college coaches Billy Donovan in Oklahoma City and Fred Hoiberg in Chicago had to, but at the same time, the way Doc left Boston made it harder to root for him in Los Angeles.

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Rivers took over the Clippers in the summer of 2013, the same summer that Dwight Howard spurned the Los Angeles Lakers in free agency, leaving them without a superstar in his prime for the first time since the early 90s after the retirements of Kareem Abdul-Jabbar and Magic Johnson, and the San Antonio Spurs had just lost to the Miami Heat in the NBA Finals in such devastating fashion, it was uncertain at that time (before, of course, they came back in 2014 with a vengeance) that they could ever recover. There was a sudden power vacuum in the Western Conference, and the Clippers and Oklahoma City Thunder appeared poised to take over. Rivers was eager to coach a roster that had Chris Paul, Blake Griffin, and DeAndre Jordan, and he, like many people, thought they could be another Big Three for him to coach. Alas, the Golden State Warriors crashed the party in the West, and the Clippers under Rivers still have not advanced past the second round of the playoffs.

Meanwhile, Brad Stevens has the Celtics in a good place. Beyond LeBron James and the Cleveland Cavaliers, any of the playoff teams in the East can beat any other team, but the Celtics currently sit second in the conference and fifth in the NBA. Isaiah Thomas has blossomed into an All-Star and someone who might get some MVP attention (though I will be shocked if anyone other than Kevin Durant, Russell Westbrook, or James Harden wins it this years), and Jae Crowder has turned into a good NBA role player and a much more valuable trade asset than Rajon Rondo, the guy who was traded to acquire Crowder. The Celtics are headed in the right direction, which I cannot say with certainty about the other team that plays at TD Garden, but it is still nice to remember Doc and Pierce for the way the made this franchise respectable again when I was a teenager. The 2008 Celtics will always have a special place in my heart as the first, and so far only championship basketball team that was also my team.

At 39, Pierce is hardly the player he once was, and has been playing significantly diminished minutes this season, but near the end of the game, Celtics fans were chanting, demanding he go back in. Doc Rivers obliged, and Pierce sank a three in the end, though the Celtics still won. TD Garden erupted in cheers. Paul Pierce, The Truth, had his final moment in front of the Garden crowd. It may not have been the right uniform; anything other than Celtics green just did not look right on him, but the fans never stopped loving this guy. After all they had been through together, the ups, the downs, the victories, and the devastating defeats, Paul Pierce was the guy making the big shot at the end. His next great moment in Boston will be when the Celtics inevitably retire his #34 to the Garden rafters, something that was destined to happen as soon as they reached the Finals in 2008. It was a fun ride, and I was glad to see it happen, even if it got overshadowed by the Super Bowl.

The Best Deal Never Made

Dallas Mavericks owner Mark Cuban is a shrewd businessman. He’s outspoken. He is one of the biggest personalities in the NBA, but has never played or coached a game. He is polarizing, and he is full of himself. He loves to quote Ayn Rand almost as much as he likes feeling like the smartest person in the room all the time. When the Mavericks failed to land free agent All-Star point guard Deron Williams in 2012 because Cuban skipped a chance to meet with Williams to film an episode of Shark Tank, basketball writers around the country and around the world jumped at the chance to poke fun at the Internet billionaire, but looking back on it, not signing Deron Williams was the smartest thing Cuban could have done.

This isn’t a knock on Deron Williams (although it is a little bit). He’s a very good player, but he’s very well paid in an era where everyone seems to have at least a pretty good point guard. Williams signed a five year $98.7 million contract to remain with the Nets as they planned to move from New Jersey to Brooklyn. Only Chris Paul of the Los Angeles Clippers, who signed a five year $107 million contract the following summer, makes more money from the point guard position than Williams. Williams and Paul came into the NBA in the same year (Williams was drafted third by the Utah Jazz, and Paul was drafted fourth by the New Orleans Hornets in 2005), and for many years, “who’s better: Williams or Paul?” was a serious debate among basketball fans, but no longer. In the years since Williams re-signed with the Nets and the Nets moved to Brooklyn, Williams has become stagnant, battled injury, and his team has underachieved, while Chris Paul is the best player on one of the best teams in the NBA’s best conference.

The red flags with Williams were apparent before Cuban had the chance to sign him, but people were willing to overlook them because of his talent. It took him a while to earn a “coach killer” reputation, but once he got it, he really got it. In 2011, his falling out with Jazz head coach (and Hall of Famer) Jerry Sloan forced Sloan into midseason retirement. Two weeks later, Williams was traded to the New Jersey Nets. After Sloan, he played under Tyrone Corbin (briefly before getting traded out of Utah), Avery Johnson, P.J. Carlesimo, Jason Kidd, and now Lionel Hollins. Six head coaches have attempted to coach Deron Williams in the last four calendar years, and in that time, Williams has been leapfrogged by Steph Curry, Damian Lillard, Kyle Lowry, John Wall, Goran Dragic. Russell Westbrook, and Kyrie Irving (if not, more players) in the hierarchy of point guards in the NBA. Even without the “coach killer” reputation he earned when he forced out a coach who had been in the same city since 1988, he it’s a bad contract two years later because the NBA is in the midst of a point guard renaissance and the supply of good point guards is so great, it would be silly to pay someone like Williams that much.

Not having to pay Williams has allowed Dallas to do other things to rebuilt and retool. Since Cuban’s infamous scheduling conflict, the Mavs have added Tyson Chandler (who was a key part of their 2011 championship squad, and would be a surefire Hall of Famer if he had played his whole career for Rick Carlisle or alongside Dirk Nowitzki), Chandler Parsons, Monta Ellis, and Rajon Rondo, while also being able to keep Dirk Nowitzki. While their defense is lacking, the Dallas Mavericks run a simple, yet ingenious offense that works beautifully with the personnel and the coach they have. Any variable, like Williams dribbling too much, or butting heads with head coach Rick Carlisle, and Dallas would not be as efficient as they are now. Meanwhile, the Brooklyn Nets have too much money tied up in Williams, Joe Johnson, and Brook Lopez, and they are struggling just to stay in the playoff picture in the less than loaded Eastern Conference. Williams is no longer the impact player he was in Utah, and the Nets do not have the flexibility to build around him. They also cannot build through the draft because of trades that send their first round picks to the Atlanta Hawks and Boston Celtics (Danny Ainge is a genius!) for years to come. They have no present, and no future, but their payroll is that of a championship contender.

This time, Mark Cuban got the last laugh. He actually was the smartest guy in the room, and he can write another book or perhaps pitch another reality show from the brilliance of this business non-transaction. Like him or hate him, he nailed it. Wouldn’t it be fun if he was also a hockey or baseball owner? He’s tried to but the Pittsburgh Penguins, Chicago Cubs, Los Angeles Dodgers, and New York Mets in the past. I can only imagine what he’d be like in the baseball hot stove league. It would be amazing, and it would be insufferable, and baseball needs a villain owner now that George Steinbrenner is gone. I’m on board.

The Past Is the Past

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An era of great basketball ended this week. Remember the 2008 Boston Celtics? That was the team that got me back into the NBA and following that league more closely than I ever had before. These days, the Celtics have a much different look, and they’re not a relevant player in the championship discussion the way they were for six straight years. Doc Rivers is now coaching Chris Paul and Blake Griffin in Los Angeles. Kevin Garnett is the veteran leader on a Brooklyn team trying to stay in the playoff picture. Paul Pierce is the veteran presence sent to Washington to teach young stars John Wall and Bradley Beal how to be winners, and is a key part of one of the best teams in the Eastern Conference. Ray Allen is currently unsigned, but not retired, waiting for a title contender in need of his outside shot off the bench. Kendrick Perkins has been playing with Kevin Durant and Russell Westbrook in Oklahoma City since the Celtics traded him for Jeff Green in the spring of 2011. With the trade that sent Celtics’ captain Rajon Rondo to Dallas earlier this week, the last piece of the starting five that never lost a series, and the last player left from the 2008 championship squad (although Leon Powe has returned to the Celtics to join he front office, and Brian Scalabrine now works as a team broadcaster) has finally left Boston. That era in Celtics basketball is officially over, and it is time to move on. The 2008 Celtics certainly have.

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The trade sent Rondo to the Dallas Mavericks for Jameer Nelson, Jae Crowder, and Brandan Wright, as well as a future 1st and 2nd round draft pick. This season, it makes the Mavs better, adding a very good playmaking point guard to a team that already has Dirk Nowitzki, Monta Ellis, and Tyson Chandler. For the Celtics, it completes the process of going young, and gives more power to second year head coach Brad Stevens.The longest tenured Celtics player is now Avery Bradley, a fifth year guard out of the University of Texas, who was drafted by the Celtics in the summer of 2010, just days after the C’s fell to the Los Angeles Lakers in seven games. Rondo’s skill set is at its best when he has great players around him. He played his best basketball when he was passing to KG, Pierce, and Allen: three players who will most definitely find themselves in the Basketball Hall of Fame as soon as they are eligible. With the exception of newcomer center Tyler Zeller, Rondo was not able to do much to elevate the play of his current Celtics teammates, and he is not enough of a scoring force in his own right to make the team competitive right now. Kelly Olynyk and Jared Sullinger are young and talented, and have plenty of upside, but they are nowhere what Kevin Garnett and Paul Pierce were in 2008, and they’re nowhere near Dirk or Chandler in 2014. A change of scenery will be good for him, and so will playing for a real championship contender for the first time since the C’s went toe-to-toe with the Miami Heat in the Eastern Conference Finals and were still the greatest obstacle standing between LeBron James and a championship ring.

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Now is the time to look back on Rondo’s time in Boston. In eight and a half seasons with the Celtics, he was one of the most exciting players in the NBA, as well as one of the most enigmatic. He was a tough competitor, and one of the most intelligent players in the game, but he often seemed bored by the regular season. Bill Simmons wrote of the difference between “Basic Cable Rondo” and “National TV Rondo.” He could have a very average or bad game on a Tuesday night in Milwaukee against an unproven point guard, and be able to flip a switch and transform into a completely different, dialed in player if the game was on ABC and Chris Paul or Steve Nash or Tony Parker was in town. He was an elite passer, but a bad jump shooter. Eventually, his paranoia about shooting from the free throw line limited his drives to the hoop, which were often Boston’s best chance at two points. When he was good, though, he was great. in 2010, 2011, and 2012, he was Boston’s best player in the playoffs. It was in those years that he stopped being the little brother to the New Big Three, and we instead started referring to KG, Pierce, Allen, and Rondo as “The Big Four.” He played through pain, and any frustration fans may have had with the low points of his game was wiped away by how dominant he was in the biggest games of the year. His contract was up at the end of the season, but while it would be nice to see #9 only wear a Celtics uniform for his NBA career, the Celtics should be focused on developing the young talent on their roster rather than maximizing Rondo’s window as a star in this league. Last year, the Celtics needed to evaluate where they were as an organization and they needed to ease Rondo back in his recovery from knee surgery. This season, Rondo has played full time, and they have added guards who were drafted in the first round, and the record was more or less the same as it was a year ago. It was time to move on. It would not surprise me, now that Rondo has been moved, that other veteran players Jeff Green, Brandon Bass, and Gerald Wallace get traded before the end of the 2014-15 season.

One thing that has stuck out to me with the Celtics this season has been how well the rest of the team plays without him. Their biggest win of the season came in a game he did not play, that the Celtics beat Joakim Noah and the Chicago Bulls in Chicago. In another game, Rondo barely played in crunch time down in Washington when rookie point guard Marcus Smart led a comeback against Paul Pierce and the Wizards, only to fall in double overtime against a far superior opponent. Smart was drafted out of Oklahoma State this summer with the sixth overall pick, and whether the Celtics were willing to admit it or not, was intended to be Rondo’s successor.

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Kelly Olynyk, who has had his share of struggles since being drafted #13 overall out of Gonzaga in 2013, has really started to come into his own, and has turned into a scorer off the bench. It’s no coincidence, in my opinion, that Olynyk has played better since being removed from the starting lineup. As a reserve, he’s had more playing time with other point guards Evan Turner, Marcus Smart, and Phil Pressey, and he’s developed better chemistry with them than he ever had with Rondo. When Olynyk was drafted, optimistic Celtics fans hoped he had a chance, as a skinny, awkward looking white guy, to be the next Dirk or the next Larry Bird (the two most famous skinny, awkward looking white guys in the history of basketball, and I realize that;s very wishful thinking), and he’s finally living up to that pipe dream a little bit, having his first 30 point game in his NBA career last week. Some of these kids might even be the foundation of the next great Celtics team, but that’s still a few years away.

Playing with better players is not the only reason I think Rajon Rondo will thrive in Dallas. The Mavericks are a very good team in a conference of very good teams, which means that the regular season is basically already the playoffs if you’re in the Western Conference. If there was ever a situation that would allow a team to get “National TV Rondo” night in and night out, this is it. There’s Chris Paul in Los Angeles, Goran Dragic and Isaiah Thomas in Phoenix, Ty Lawson in Denver, Steph Curry in Golden State, Damian Lillard in Portland, Tony Parker in San Antonio, Russell Westbrook in Oklahoma City, Dante Exum in Utah, Mike Conley, Jr. in Memphis, and Jrue Holiday in New Orleans. There is an abundance of good point guards in the NBA (I mean, the Celtics had three on their roster after trading Rondo even if Jameer Nelson didn’t come to Boston in that deal), and that is most apparent in the West. He will not be able to check out mentally or take any nights off. He has his work cut out for him, and it should be a fun thing to watch.

The Celtics now find themselves rebuilding with a great college coach and the champions of years past are not walking though that door. As Celtics fans, we’ve seen this movie before, but it doesn’t seem that bad. Brad Stevens seems to be more comfortable in the NBA than Rick Pitino did, and he’s not hung up on the possibility of drafting a franchise changing player with the #1 overall pick like the C’s were banking on with some guy named Tim Duncan in 1997. It doesn’t happen overnight, but the Celtics seem to be heading in the right direction long term. Danny Ainge knows what he’s doing, and he’s built the Celtics into a winner before. They are young, they play hard, and the best basketball for the players on that team is still in the future. What Rondo did in Boston was great, but like Doc, KG, Pierce, Allen, and Perk before him, it’s time for something new.

Surviving the NBA Playoffs as a Celtics Fan

As a Celtics fan, it’s strange going into the NBA playoffs without a horse in the race. Since the 2007-08 season, the C’s had been a legitimate championship contender, but that changed last summer with the departures of Kevin Garnett, Paul Pierce, and Doc Rivers. The trades that Danny Ainge made sending those guys out of town have helped build the Celtics for the years going forward, but left them as out of the tournament and in the draft lottery in the meantime. I’m not the biggest NBA fan and I’ve been much more excited about the NHL all year, but there are still plenty of narratives to be excited about during the 2014 playoff tournament. As one of the most successful franchises in all of professional sports, and one of the model franchises in the game of basketball along with the Lakers and Spurs, there are plenty of Celtics alumni in key positions around the NBA. The C’s are an organization that takes care of their own, and can get you a good position on another team in you choose to leave. Even though they’re not in it this year, the Celtics’ influence can still be felt on the Association this spring.

Larry Bird’s Indiana Pacers. After a one season hiatus, Larry Bird signed back on as Team President of the Indiana Pacers. Last year, Indiana made it to the Eastern Conference Finals before bowing out to the Miami Heat in seven games. Bird’s team has been a model of how to build through the middle and getting a good roster without tanking a season. Paul George has emerged as a star player in this league, and Lance Stephenson and Roy Hibbert are great players when they’re on their game. The Pacers earned the top seed in the East, because they were determined to have the home court advantage in a rematch with Miami. They struggled out of the gate in Game 1 against the Atlanta Hawks, and if they get upset, Bird might find himself wheeling and dealing to retool in a big way this summer. They’ve built high expectations for themselves, and now is the time to deliver. Frank Vogel, the Pacers coach who previously served as an assistant coach for the Celtics from 2001 to 2004, might find himself in the hot seat if the Indiana ends the season anywhere short of the NBA Finals. The state of Indiana has a long and storied tradition with the game of basketball that predates Indiana State hero Larry Bird by decades, but one thing that has evaded them is an NBA Title. Since started working for the team, the Pacers have been arguably the best run and most successful NBA team that has not won a championship. Now is as good a time as any to make that happen.

  Kevin McHale’s Houston Rockets. McHale did not experience the same level of success as an executive as his former teammates Bird and Ainge, but he is a pretty good coach. His biggest hit when he was running the Minnesota Timberwolves was drafting and developing some high school kid named Kevin Garnett into one of the best players in the history of the NBA. After the Wolves failed to improve after trading KG to the Celtics, McHale got canned and was replaced by Kurt Rambis of all people. Rambis’ failed tenure in Minnesota validated what McHale was able to do, and he’s got the Houston Rockets playing really well now. Rockets GM Daryl Morey, who also has ties to the Celtics organization, made some smart acquisitions trading for James Harden, and bringing in Jeremy Lin and Dwight Howard. This is another example of building without tanking, acquiring assets that can be used to trade for a blue chip player, like the Danny Ainge did to get Ray Allen and Kevin Garnett in 2007, and like he might again this summer if he can pull off a trade for Kevin Love. Houston has their hands full with the Portland Trail Blazers, but they will be contending in the Western Conference for years to come.

Doc Rivers’ Los Angeles Clippers. On one hand it was saddening and baffling to see Doc Rivers leave the Celtics last summer, but the other hand, it was the right move for both Doc and the Celtics. Doc did great things in Boston. In 2008, he coached the C’s to their 17th NBA Title, and their first since 1986. He got Boston, and was one of the powerful voices in Boston sports after last year’s Boston Marathon tragedy, but it was time to go in a different direction. Doc is the kind of coach you get for a team that wants to win a championship now, and that wasn’t going to happen in Boston this year. Brad Stevens is the guy who will get the most out of the young roster, while Doc had value for a team like the Clippers, who are already a playoff team, but their star players like Chris Paul and Blake Griffin need guidance in getting to the next level. This year, the Clips had their best regular season in franchise history. That’s not saying much as Doc went from one of the most successful franchises in all of sports to one of the most historically futile, but he does have them in a good position this year. It’s a strange year in the NBA. The Celtics and Lakers are both missing the playoffs for only the second time in NBA history, and the Clippers are the LA team playing meaningful games in April. The Knicks, Sixers, and Pistons are on the outside looking in as well. The status quo has been thrown out this year. No wonder David Stern left when he did.

Kevin Garnett’s and Paul Pierce’s Brooklyn Nets. Seeing KG and Pierce in a different uniform hurt even more than seeing Doc coaching the Clippers. Both of these guys will have their numbers (5 and 34) in the rafters of the TD Garden someday, and they are still worth rooting for in the playoffs this year despite playing for a division rival. The draft picks the C’s got back in return for their two aging stars are going to make the Celtics better long after their careers are over, and the Nets will have trouble keeping those picks out of the lottery without KG and Pierce, especially given the injury histories of Deron Williams and Brook Lopez. In the meantime, the Nets have an interesting team that had Miami’s number during the regular season. Rookie head coach Jason Kidd has apparently gotten past his early season blunders and Brooklyn could be a surprise team coming out of the East. Another former Celtic, Jason Collins, the NBA’s first openly gay player, is on the Nets, so that’s another reason to root for Brooklyn if you’re a Celtics fan. The Nets are playing to the Toronto Raptors, who are not accustomed to making that playoffs. KG and Paul Pierce have been in this spot before, although they’re wearing different colors this time around. It feels weird rooting for the Nets and rooting for Jason Kidd, but those guys make it okay.

Tom Thibodeau’s Chicago Bulls. Coach Thibs was an assistant coach for the Celtics when they won it all in 2008 and when they made it to a heartbreaking Game 7 against the Lakers in 2010. He’s a defensive genius and was a well respected assistant who never got a head coaching opportunity before the Chicago Bulls came calling. Thibodeau has made the Bulls a consistent contender, even with former MVP point guard Derrick Rose being constantly injured for the last three seasons. While an assistant in Boston, he made the Celtics into the best defensive team in the NBA, and in Chicago, he has made Joakim Noah into the 2014 NBA Defensive player of the year. Thibodeau’s teams have been though a lot, but they never go down without a fight, it seems. They have their hands full with John Wall and the Washington Wizards, but if there’s one thing we’ve come to expect from the Bulls, it’s an honest effort.

Rick Carlisle’s Dallas Mavericks. Carlisle was a reserve for the Celtics when they won their 16th NBA Title in 1986. He retired from playing in 1989, and started his coaching career the following season. He was an assistant coach for the Indiana Pacers under Larry Bird, and later became a head coach for the Detroit Pistons, Pacers, and Dallas Mavericks. When he guided the Mavs to their franchise’s first NBA Title in 2011, he became one of just 11 people to win a championship in the NBA as both a player and as a head coach (that list includes Bill Russell, Phil Jackson, Bill Sharman, Tommy Heinsohn, KC Jones, and Pat Riley that I was able to come up with off the top of my head). Carlisle has quietly become one of the best coaches in the NBA, but his year he’s matched up against the very best in the first round. Dallas is back in the playoffs, but they’re up against one of their Texas rivals, Gregg Popovich and the San Antonio Spurs. The series should be a lot tighter than your typical #1 vs. #8 series.

Brian Scalabrine’s Golden State Warriors. Scal was a fan favorite when he was in Boston, despite being the last guy on the bench when they won it all in 2008. He’s a real character, and is a much smarter basketball guy than a lot of people give him credit. When his playing career ended, Scalabrine became a team broadcaster for the Celtics, filling in for Tommy Heinsohn as the color commentator on TV during road trips. Last summer, Scal scouted and worked out with Kelly Olynyk before the Celtics drafted him, and was considered as an option to replace Doc Rivers before Ainge eventually hired Brad Stevens away from Butler University. After that, Scal took a job as an assistant coach for the Golden State Warriors, working under Mark Jackson. It was reported a few weeks ago, that Scal was getting reassigned by the Warriors, but the Warriors front office wanted to keep him within the organization. If the Dubs have an early playoff exit, it could be the end for Jackson, and Scalabrine could possibly be their next head coach.

The Boston Bruins. Who am I kidding? This is the real answer. If you’re a Celtics fan and you’re wondering what to watch this spring, there is a great hard-nosed hockey team with championship aspirations that plays in the same building as the C’s. In fact, the Bruins own the building and rent it out to the Celtics. They won the President’s Trophy as the best team in the regular season, but have their sights aimed higher than that. Patrice Bergeron should win the Selke Trophy as the NHL’s best defensive forward. Zdeno Chara should win the Norris Trophy as the NHL’s best defenseman. Tuukka Rask should win the Vezina Trophy as the NHL’s best goaltender. What really matters is the Stanley Cup. It’s the best trophy in all of sports, and the Bruins have as good a chance as anyone. They’re playing the Detroit Red Wings in round one, which makes for a classic Original Six match up.

There’s nothing better than playoff hockey, and without the Celtics in the NBA playoffs, it’s the only playoffs in town.